Bay Area Black Panther says today's civil disobedience evolved from '60s

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Saturu Ned of Oakland was a founding Black Panther Party member

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Black Panther mural

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Black Panther activists in the 1960s.

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Archives: Black Panther poster

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Black Panther exhibit at the Oakland Museum of California

Revolutionaries or rebels?

Admired or feared?

The Black Panther Party was a Bay Area force that both changed and shocked the nation.

Saturu Ned, one of the founders of the Black Panther Party, said much of today’s civil disobedience and acts of protest – like athletes not standing for the national anthem – echoes what he and his activists did in the ‘60s.

They’re standing up for a “belief system,” Ned said of Oakland Raider Marshawn Lynch and ex-49er Colin Kaepernick. “This started from the foundation of the party standing up for what’s right,” Ned said. 

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Saturu Ned of Oakland was a founding Black Panther Party member

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Black Panther mural

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Black Panther activists in the 1960s.

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Archives: Black Panther poster

 
 ] Hide Caption  ] Show Caption

Black Panther exhibit at the Oakland Museum of California

false
false
false
Up Next:


false
false
false

Stories You May Be Interested In - Includes Advertiser Stories 

false
false
false